Latest Tweets:

*41
philipbloom:

After an epic sort out my 4K edit suite is now rocking!! New to the heart of it is the 6 core MacPro. Fully specced out iMac is still here on the left. The right screen is the 27” Thunderbolt and the middle screen is the $500 UHD 39” Seiki (bought from Amazon here http://tinyurl.com/Seiki39 ) running straight off the MacPro HDMI 1.4. Event Opals give me audio which match the image combined with Apogee Duet 2, @rodemic Classic II valve mic in front for VO. Logitech mouse, stacks of @gtechnology g-raids pulsing under the desk with USB3 portable drives plugged in behind the monitor for on the go projects. Now that’s done I can finally get back to being more productive in the edit! So many edits to finish off (and yes that is the Blackmagic 4k sitting there in the front, review at some point I hope) !

philipbloom:

After an epic sort out my 4K edit suite is now rocking!! New to the heart of it is the 6 core MacPro. Fully specced out iMac is still here on the left. The right screen is the 27” Thunderbolt and the middle screen is the $500 UHD 39” Seiki (bought from Amazon here http://tinyurl.com/Seiki39 ) running straight off the MacPro HDMI 1.4. Event Opals give me audio which match the image combined with Apogee Duet 2, @rodemic Classic II valve mic in front for VO. Logitech mouse, stacks of @gtechnology g-raids pulsing under the desk with USB3 portable drives plugged in behind the monitor for on the go projects. Now that’s done I can finally get back to being more productive in the edit! So many edits to finish off (and yes that is the Blackmagic 4k sitting there in the front, review at some point I hope) !

jim-logiudice:

Here’s the set we built for Daft Punk’s Grammy performance tonight.

Tino Schaedler and Optimist Design teamed up with Daft Arts to create this amazing mid-century modern design set. Check out the old school audio equipment integrated into the set. Very cool. The recording booth is patterned after the “Mother” space craft control room from the movie Alien. The robots gold mirror mixing console actually worked and was played live.

(set construction and prop fabrication by Vision Scenery)

Awesome.

Q: “May I have a salad instead of fries with the Whopper?”

A: “You’re the first person ever to ask for that…”

#burgerking
 (at Burger King)

Q: “May I have a salad instead of fries with the Whopper?”

A: “You’re the first person ever to ask for that…”

#burgerking
(at Burger King)

Great question from Gene Munster (from Techcrunch today). What do you think? Will Apple be able to create new categories as they did with personal computing, portable music, smartphones and tablets? 

And if so - what?

Great question from Gene Munster (from Techcrunch today). What do you think? Will Apple be able to create new categories as they did with personal computing, portable music, smartphones and tablets?

And if so - what?

Save the planet! It’s the only one with cocoa beans!!

#hershey #chocolate
#earth #savetheplanet (at Hershey’s Chocolate World)

Save the planet! It’s the only one with cocoa beans!!

#hershey #chocolate
#earth #savetheplanet (at Hershey’s Chocolate World)

Discovery (at Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center)

Discovery (at Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center)

Har vært fanboy. Nå hjem og lese! Har du kjøpt første nummer? #lunchcomic #kjelltech  (at Tronsmo Bøker & Tegneserier)

Har vært fanboy. Nå hjem og lese! Har du kjøpt første nummer? #lunchcomic #kjelltech (at Tronsmo Bøker & Tegneserier)

*1

Daft Punk “Get Lucky” inspired by every 10 years from 1920-2020. Awesome.

L’histoire de la musique enregistrée à travers une reprise de Daft Punk : 1920-2020 !

The New Yorker: Shouts & Murmurs: The Collected Letters of Marissa Mayer and David Karp

newyorker:

My darling David,

Don’t let these earthly considerations stand in the way of our relationship. Getting to know Tumblr has been the biggest joy of my life. I have never felt so young, so alive, so full of hope for the future as when I am watching your metrics rise exponentially each day.

Oh, I…

(Source: newyorker.com)

marissamayr:

I’m delighted to announce that we’ve reached an agreement to acquire Tumblr! 
We promise not to screw it up.  Tumblr is incredibly special and has a great thing going.  We will operate Tumblr independently.  David Karp will remain CEO.  The product roadmap, their team, their wit and irreverence will all remain the same as will their mission to empower creators to make their best work and get it in front of the audience they deserve.  Yahoo! will help Tumblr get even better, faster.
Tumblr has built an amazing place to follow the world’s creators. From art to architecture, fashion to food, Tumblr hosts 105 million different blogs.  With more than 300 million monthly unique visitors and 120,000 signups every day, Tumblr is one of thefastest-growing media networks in the world.  Tumblr sees 900 posts per second (!) and 24 billion minutes spent onsite each month.  On mobile, more than half of Tumblr’s users are using the mobile app, and those users do an average of 7 sessions per day.  Tumblr’s tremendous popularity and engagement among creators, curators and audiences of all ages brings a significant new community of users to the Yahoo! network.  The combination of Tumblr+Yahoo! could grow Yahoo!’s audience by 50% to more than a billion monthly visitors, and could grow traffic by approximately 20%.
In terms of working together, Tumblr can deploy Yahoo!’s personalization technology and search infrastructure to help its users discover creators, bloggers, and content they’ll love.  In turn, Tumblr brings 50 billion blog posts (and 75 million more arriving each day) to Yahoo!’s media network and search experiences.  The two companies will also work together to create advertising opportunities that are seamless and enhance user experience.
As I’ve said before, companies are all about people.  Getting to know the Tumblr team has been really amazing.  I’ve long held the view that in all things art and design, you can feel the spirit and demeanor of those who create them.  That’s why it was no surprise to me that David Karp is one of the nicest, most empathetic people I’ve ever met.  He’s also one of the most perceptive, capable entrepreneurs I’ve worked with.  His respect for Tumblr’s community of creators is awesome, and I’m absolutely delighted to have him and his entire team join Yahoo!.   
Both Tumblr and Yahoo! share a vision to make the Internet the ultimate creative canvas by focusing on users, design — and building experiences that delight and inspire the world every day.
http://yahoo.tumblr.com/

marissamayr:

I’m delighted to announce that we’ve reached an agreement to acquire Tumblr! 

We promise not to screw it up.  Tumblr is incredibly special and has a great thing going.  We will operate Tumblr independently.  David Karp will remain CEO.  The product roadmap, their team, their wit and irreverence will all remain the same as will their mission to empower creators to make their best work and get it in front of the audience they deserve.  Yahoo! will help Tumblr get even better, faster.

Tumblr has built an amazing place to follow the world’s creators. From art to architecture, fashion to food, Tumblr hosts 105 million different blogs.  With more than 300 million monthly unique visitors and 120,000 signups every day, Tumblr is one of thefastest-growing media networks in the world.  Tumblr sees 900 posts per second (!) and 24 billion minutes spent onsite each month.  On mobile, more than half of Tumblr’s users are using the mobile app, and those users do an average of 7 sessions per day.  Tumblr’s tremendous popularity and engagement among creators, curators and audiences of all ages brings a significant new community of users to the Yahoo! network.  The combination of Tumblr+Yahoo! could grow Yahoo!’s audience by 50% to more than a billion monthly visitors, and could grow traffic by approximately 20%.

In terms of working together, Tumblr can deploy Yahoo!’s personalization technology and search infrastructure to help its users discover creators, bloggers, and content they’ll love.  In turn, Tumblr brings 50 billion blog posts (and 75 million more arriving each day) to Yahoo!’s media network and search experiences.  The two companies will also work together to create advertising opportunities that are seamless and enhance user experience.

As I’ve said before, companies are all about people.  Getting to know the Tumblr team has been really amazing.  I’ve long held the view that in all things art and design, you can feel the spirit and demeanor of those who create them.  That’s why it was no surprise to me that David Karp is one of the nicest, most empathetic people I’ve ever met.  He’s also one of the most perceptive, capable entrepreneurs I’ve worked with.  His respect for Tumblr’s community of creators is awesome, and I’m absolutely delighted to have him and his entire team join Yahoo!.   

Both Tumblr and Yahoo! share a vision to make the Internet the ultimate creative canvas by focusing on users, design — and building experiences that delight and inspire the world every day.

http://yahoo.tumblr.com/

*63

"We promise not to screw it up. Tumblr is incredibly special and has a great thing going. We will operate Tumblr independently. David Karp will remain CEO. The product roadmap, their team, their wit and irreverence will all remain the same as will their mission to empower creators to make their best work and get it in front of the audience they deserve. Yahoo! will help Tumblr get even better, faster."

Marissa Mayer.

Chill, everyone.

(via stevekovach)

*35
hautepop:

My Facebook’s getting quite keen on The Color Run, “The happiest 5k on the planet” - or a truly genius bit of experiential marketing from Dulux in aid of Cancer Research. It’s coming to London on 14 July.

The concept:

“Wear white at the starting line
Finish plastered in color”

“Less about your 10-minute-mile and more about having the time of your life, The Color Run is a five-kilometre, un-timed race in which thousands of participants are doused from head to toe in different colors at each kilometre. The fun continues at the finish line with a gigantic “Color Festival,” using more colored powder to create happiness and lasting memories, not to mention millions of vivid color combinations”


This is extremely clever.

It’s got deep, primal cultural reference points - the Hindu festival of Holi, and La Tomantina, the Spanish festival with the tomato-fight. More broadly than that, Carnival.

It’s Instagrammable and shareable as all fuck. Not just social run-with-your-friends, but producing fantastic digital social currency as well. It’s got media crossover nailed.

And it steals from the best - specifically Fallon’s Sony Bravia “Color Like No Other” campaign. The 2005 Bouncing Balls ad - and more particularly the 2006 Paint slot, where director Jonathan Glazer used 70,000 litres of paint, mortars, bottle bombs and 1,700 detonators to redecorate Glasgow’s Toryglen estate to a soundtrack of Rossini. 

That, and this Dulux work, is marketing at its most emotionally evocative and beautiful - which is a conflicting feeling. I don’t especially like being sold to effectively: it makes me feel like I am being manipulated. 

(Then again, I had no idea the Sony Bravia was a TV rather than a mobile phone, and indeed first recalled the campaign as being by Samsung. Far East Asian company, beginning with S… So perhaps advertising’s influence is not exactly invincible yet.)

Anyway, campaign is from IMG STG (Sports Technology Group). Dulux should do more work with them, because their TV campaign by BBH is unfortunately falling flat on its face.

hautepop:

My Facebook’s getting quite keen on The Color Run, “The happiest 5k on the planet” - or a truly genius bit of experiential marketing from Dulux in aid of Cancer Research. It’s coming to London on 14 July.

The concept:

“Wear white at the starting line
Finish plastered in color”

“Less about your 10-minute-mile and more about having the time of your life, The Color Run is a five-kilometre, un-timed race in which thousands of participants are doused from head to toe in different colors at each kilometre. The fun continues at the finish line with a gigantic “Color Festival,” using more colored powder to create happiness and lasting memories, not to mention millions of vivid color combinations”

This is extremely clever.

It’s got deep, primal cultural reference points - the Hindu festival of Holi, and La Tomantina, the Spanish festival with the tomato-fight. More broadly than that, Carnival.

It’s Instagrammable and shareable as all fuck. Not just social run-with-your-friends, but producing fantastic digital social currency as well. It’s got media crossover nailed.

And it steals from the best - specifically Fallon’s Sony Bravia “Color Like No Other” campaign. The 2005 Bouncing Balls ad - and more particularly the 2006 Paint slot, where director Jonathan Glazer used 70,000 litres of paint, mortars, bottle bombs and 1,700 detonators to redecorate Glasgow’s Toryglen estate to a soundtrack of Rossini.

That, and this Dulux work, is marketing at its most emotionally evocative and beautiful - which is a conflicting feeling. I don’t especially like being sold to effectively: it makes me feel like I am being manipulated.

(Then again, I had no idea the Sony Bravia was a TV rather than a mobile phone, and indeed first recalled the campaign as being by Samsung. Far East Asian company, beginning with S… So perhaps advertising’s influence is not exactly invincible yet.)

Anyway, campaign is from IMG STG (Sports Technology Group). Dulux should do more work with them, because their TV campaign by BBH is unfortunately falling flat on its face.

neurosciencestuff:

Brain implants: Restoring memory with a microchip
William Gibson’s popular science fiction tale “Johnny Mnemonic” foresaw sensitive information being carried by microchips in the brain by 2021. A team of American neuroscientists could be making this fantasy world a reality.
Their motivation is different but the outcome would be somewhat similar. Hailed as one of 2013’s top ten technological breakthroughs by MIT, the work by the University of Southern California, North Carolina’s Wake Forest University and other partners has actually spanned a decade.
But the U.S.-wide team now thinks that it will see a memory device being implanted in a small number of human volunteers within two years and available to patients in five to 10 years. They can’t quite contain their excitement.
“I never thought I’d see this in my lifetime,” said Ted Berger, professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. “I might not benefit from it myself but my kids will.”
Rob Hampson, associate professor of physiology and pharmacology at Wake Forest University, agrees. “We keep pushing forward, every time I put an estimate on it, it gets shorter and shorter.”
The scientists — who bring varied skills to the table, including mathematical modeling and psychiatry — believe they have cracked how long-term memories are made, stored and retrieved and how to replicate this process in brains that are damaged, particularly by stroke or localized injury.
Berger said they record a memory being made, in an undamaged area of the brain, then use that data to predict what a damaged area “downstream” should be doing. Electrodes are then used to stimulate the damaged area to replicate the action of the undamaged cells.
They concentrate on the hippocampus — part of the cerebral cortex which sits deep in the brain — where short-term memories become long-term ones. Berger has looked at how electrical signals travel through neurons there to form those long-term memories and has used his expertise in mathematical modeling to mimic these movements using electronics.
Hampson, whose university has done much of the animal studies, adds: “We support and reinforce the signal in the hippocampus but we are moving forward with the idea that if you can study enough of the inputs and outputs to replace the function of the hippocampus, you can bypass the hippocampus.”
The team’s experiments on rats and monkeys have shown that certain brain functions can be replaced with signals via electrodes. You would think that the work of then creating an implant for people and getting such a thing approved would be a Herculean task, but think again.
For 15 years, people have been having brain implants to provide deep brain stimulation to treat epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease — a reported 80,000 people have now had such devices placed in their brains. So many of the hurdles have already been overcome — particularly the “yuck factor” and the fear factor.
“It’s now commonly accepted that humans will have electrodes put in them — it’s done for epilepsy, deep brain stimulation, (that has made it) easier for investigative research, it’s much more acceptable now than five to 10 years ago,” Hampson says.
Much of the work that remains now is in shrinking down the electronics.
“Right now it’s not a device, it’s a fair amount of equipment,”Hampson says. “We’re probably looking at devices in the five to 10 year range for human patients.”
The ultimate goal in memory research would be to treat Alzheimer’s Disease but unlike in stroke or localized brain injury, Alzheimer’s tends to affect many parts of the brain, especially in its later stages, making these implants a less likely option any time soon.
Berger foresees a future, however, where drugs and implants could be used together to treat early dementia. Drugs could be used to enhance the action of cells that surround the most damaged areas, and the team’s memory implant could be used to replace a lot of the lost cells in the center of the damaged area. “I think the best strategy is going to involve both drugs and devices,” he says.
Unfortunately, the team found that its method can’t help patients with advanced dementia.
“When looking at a patient with mild memory loss, there’s probably enough residual signal to work with, but not when there’s significant memory loss,” Hampson said.
Constantine Lyketsos, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at John Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore which is trialing a deep brain stimulator implant for Alzheimer’s patients was a little skeptical of the other team’s claims.
“The brain has a lot of redundancy, it can function pretty well if loses one or two parts. But memory involves circuits diffusely dispersed throughout the brain so it’s hard to envision.” However, he added that it was more likely to be successful in helping victims of stroke or localized brain injury as indeed its makers are aiming to do.
The UK’s Alzheimer’s Society is cautiously optimistic.
“Finding ways to combat symptoms caused by changes in the brain is an ongoing battle for researchers. An implant like this one is an interesting avenue to explore,” said Doug Brown, director of research and development.
Hampson says the team’s breakthrough is “like the difference between a cane, to help you walk, and a prosthetic limb — it’s two different approaches.”
It will still take time for many people to accept their findings and their claims, he says, but they don’t expect to have a shortage of volunteers stepping forward to try their implant — the project is partly funded by the U.S. military which is looking for help with battlefield injuries.
There are U.S. soldiers coming back from operations with brain trauma and a neurologist at DARPA (the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) is asking “what can you do for my boys?” Hampson says.
“That’s what it’s all about.”

neurosciencestuff:

Brain implants: Restoring memory with a microchip

William Gibson’s popular science fiction tale “Johnny Mnemonic” foresaw sensitive information being carried by microchips in the brain by 2021. A team of American neuroscientists could be making this fantasy world a reality.

Their motivation is different but the outcome would be somewhat similar. Hailed as one of 2013’s top ten technological breakthroughs by MIT, the work by the University of Southern California, North Carolina’s Wake Forest University and other partners has actually spanned a decade.

But the U.S.-wide team now thinks that it will see a memory device being implanted in a small number of human volunteers within two years and available to patients in five to 10 years. They can’t quite contain their excitement.

“I never thought I’d see this in my lifetime,” said Ted Berger, professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. “I might not benefit from it myself but my kids will.”

Rob Hampson, associate professor of physiology and pharmacology at Wake Forest University, agrees. “We keep pushing forward, every time I put an estimate on it, it gets shorter and shorter.”

The scientists — who bring varied skills to the table, including mathematical modeling and psychiatry — believe they have cracked how long-term memories are made, stored and retrieved and how to replicate this process in brains that are damaged, particularly by stroke or localized injury.

Berger said they record a memory being made, in an undamaged area of the brain, then use that data to predict what a damaged area “downstream” should be doing. Electrodes are then used to stimulate the damaged area to replicate the action of the undamaged cells.

They concentrate on the hippocampus — part of the cerebral cortex which sits deep in the brain — where short-term memories become long-term ones. Berger has looked at how electrical signals travel through neurons there to form those long-term memories and has used his expertise in mathematical modeling to mimic these movements using electronics.

Hampson, whose university has done much of the animal studies, adds: “We support and reinforce the signal in the hippocampus but we are moving forward with the idea that if you can study enough of the inputs and outputs to replace the function of the hippocampus, you can bypass the hippocampus.”

The team’s experiments on rats and monkeys have shown that certain brain functions can be replaced with signals via electrodes. You would think that the work of then creating an implant for people and getting such a thing approved would be a Herculean task, but think again.

For 15 years, people have been having brain implants to provide deep brain stimulation to treat epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease — a reported 80,000 people have now had such devices placed in their brains. So many of the hurdles have already been overcome — particularly the “yuck factor” and the fear factor.

“It’s now commonly accepted that humans will have electrodes put in them — it’s done for epilepsy, deep brain stimulation, (that has made it) easier for investigative research, it’s much more acceptable now than five to 10 years ago,” Hampson says.

Much of the work that remains now is in shrinking down the electronics.

“Right now it’s not a device, it’s a fair amount of equipment,”Hampson says. “We’re probably looking at devices in the five to 10 year range for human patients.”

The ultimate goal in memory research would be to treat Alzheimer’s Disease but unlike in stroke or localized brain injury, Alzheimer’s tends to affect many parts of the brain, especially in its later stages, making these implants a less likely option any time soon.

Berger foresees a future, however, where drugs and implants could be used together to treat early dementia. Drugs could be used to enhance the action of cells that surround the most damaged areas, and the team’s memory implant could be used to replace a lot of the lost cells in the center of the damaged area. “I think the best strategy is going to involve both drugs and devices,” he says.

Unfortunately, the team found that its method can’t help patients with advanced dementia.

“When looking at a patient with mild memory loss, there’s probably enough residual signal to work with, but not when there’s significant memory loss,” Hampson said.

Constantine Lyketsos, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at John Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore which is trialing a deep brain stimulator implant for Alzheimer’s patients was a little skeptical of the other team’s claims.

“The brain has a lot of redundancy, it can function pretty well if loses one or two parts. But memory involves circuits diffusely dispersed throughout the brain so it’s hard to envision.” However, he added that it was more likely to be successful in helping victims of stroke or localized brain injury as indeed its makers are aiming to do.

The UK’s Alzheimer’s Society is cautiously optimistic.

“Finding ways to combat symptoms caused by changes in the brain is an ongoing battle for researchers. An implant like this one is an interesting avenue to explore,” said Doug Brown, director of research and development.

Hampson says the team’s breakthrough is “like the difference between a cane, to help you walk, and a prosthetic limb — it’s two different approaches.”

It will still take time for many people to accept their findings and their claims, he says, but they don’t expect to have a shortage of volunteers stepping forward to try their implant — the project is partly funded by the U.S. military which is looking for help with battlefield injuries.

There are U.S. soldiers coming back from operations with brain trauma and a neurologist at DARPA (the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) is asking “what can you do for my boys?” Hampson says.

“That’s what it’s all about.”

*70
youhadmeathelloworld:

No doubt - the life of a programmer!

youhadmeathelloworld:

No doubt - the life of a programmer!

There’s something #fishy on my shoe.

There’s something #fishy on my shoe.